How To Import Wood Products Into Canada

Your how to guide on wooden articles into Canada

When you import non-timber forest products, primary wood products, pulp and paper products, as well as wood-fabricated materials into Canada, you must know what government parties are involved, what regulations must be followed, and the fundamental aspects of wood imports.

Parties Involved:

  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
  • National Plant Protection Organization (From Exporting Country)
  • United States Department of Agriculture (U.S. Exports Only)
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) for the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES)
  • Customs Broker
  • Carrier

Main Regulations:

  • Articles without bark and made of processed wood materials (material subjected to conditions such as heat, glue, pressure or any combination thereof) are approved entry by the CFIA without additional documents.
  • Articles without bark and made of unprocessed wood materials will require a phytosanitary certificate.
  • Wooden articles that are less than 1.5 cm thick and not containing bark will most likely be approved for import with no additional document requirements.
  • Wooden articles that are greater than 1.5 cm thick or containing bark, depending on the origin, could require a Plant Protection Import Permit (issued by CFIA), a Phytosanitary Certificate (certified by the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of the exporting country), or a Phytosanitary Certificate for Re-export (certified by USDA).
  • Other wooden furniture classified under 9403.60, regardless of thickness, made with unprocessed wood, depending on the origin, could require a Plant Protection Import Permit (issued by CFIA), a Phytosanitary Certificate (certified by the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of the exporting country), or a Phytosanitary Certificate for Re-export (certified by USDA).
  • Certain species may be listed as endangered under CITES and therefore CITES Certificates may be required.

Import Fundamentals:

  • You will be acting as the Importer of Record. Therefore, you are the party ultimately responsible for the accuracy and completeness of the import declaration; as well as, the payment of applicable duties and taxes into Canada
  • Duty and tax must be paid upon importation into Canada.
  • The rate of duty is determined by the tariff of the commodity being imported, the value of the goods and, the origin of the goods.
  • Certain import documentation is required to be presented to the border services officer at the port of entry.
  • Your import may be subject to a customs review, inspection or audit prior to, or after the importation. Additional fees may be levied by the Government of Canada for these services.
  • You are required to keep your import records for six years following the date of import and can be audited by Customs at any point during this time.

FAQ: Wooded Article Imports

Can I Import Wood And Articles Made Of Wood Or Containing Wood From Another Country Into Canada?

Every item made of wood or containing wood, including decorative and household items, musical instruments, and wooden pieces used for further processing, must meet Canadian import requirements.

If you would like to import any product made of wood or containing wood, you will need to determine the following:

  • Is it greater than, less than or equal to 1.5 cm thick?
  • Does the item contain bark?
  • Is the product made with “processed” or “unprocessed” wood materials?

Knowing the answers to these questions will help you determine if the wood product is admissible or not, and if so, what requirements must be met.

Less than 1.5 cm thick and not containing bark: Items that match this description will most likely be approved for import with no additional document requirements.

Greater than 1.5 cm thick or containing bark: Depending on the origin, items that match this description could require any or all of the following:

  • Plant Protection Import Permit – issued by CFIA
  • Phytosanitary Certificate – certified by the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of the exporting country
  • Phytosanitary Certificate for Re-export – certified by USDA

Made with unprocessed wood: Depending on the origin, could require any or all of the following:

  • Plant Protection Import Permit – issued by CFIA
  • Phytosanitary Certificate – certified by the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of the exporting country
  • Phytosanitary Certificate for Re-export – certified by USDA if shipping from the U.S.
Do Wooden Shipping Pallets Fall Under Wood Import Regulations?

Yes, wooden pallets used for shipping are regulated and must meet the import requirements. In most cases, pallets must be heat treated and meet ISPM 15 standards. If a wood pallet is inspected and found to contain pests, the entire shipment will likely need to be exported or destroyed.

Can I Import Wooden Furniture Into Canada?

In general, the CFIA import requirements for wooden furniture are:

  • Articles without bark and made of processed wood materials (material subjected to conditions such as heat, glue, pressure or any combination thereof) are approved for entry by the CFIA without additional documents
  • Articles without bark and made of unprocessed wood materials will require a phytosanitary certificate
  • Articles with bark will require a phytosanitary certificate

The phytosanitary certificate must be obtained from the National Plant Protection Organization of the exporting country prior to import and must accompany the shipment.

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